Arizona Equality Official Website tracking the progress of the complaint
filed against the State of Arizona on January 6, 2014,
for Marriage Equality.

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  New Information on the Website Regarding the Complaint

Arizona Same-Sex Wedding Bring Planning Disappointments
Arizona RepublicMegan Finnerty from the Arizona Republic writes, "The headlines, Twitter updates and scrolling TV news tickers could give the impression that gay couples across America are buying his-and-his cake toppers and registering for hers-and-hers hand-towel sets."

Echo Magazine: ​Second lawsuit

Echo Magazine

Pizer said there's nothing inconsistent about filing a lawsuit similar to the one filed earlier this year by Phoenix attorney Shawn Aiken, and suggested that the two groups could collaborate.

In a telephone interview with Echo Magazine, Aiken said that he was informed of the Lambda Legal lawsuit two days before it was filed. He said the lawsuits outline similar arguments.

"It never hurts to have a second lawsuit on a question of this importance," Aiken said. He said there's a "genuine interest" in having the two groups work together.

Meet Arizona Families: Joe Connolly and Terry Pochert

"If I could marry you, I would ask you right now," Joe Connolly said from across the table to Terry Pochert. The two men exchanged onion rings at that very moment, a silly gesture that meant much more. Despite how much they loved each other, it was 1995, and the thought of same-sex couples having the freedom to marry was a distant dream. Instead, Terry and Joe made a promise to one another that they would live their lives together in love.

Nearly 19 years later, Terry and Joe are still happily in love, and their dream of being husband and husband has nearly come true. Their love story has come a long way, not unlike the road to marriage equality in Arizona -- but their journey is not over.

HRC, The Human Rights Campaign, Provides Support for Plaintiffs in Current Lawsuits

Plaintiffs in Lawsuit Against State of ArizonaThe Human Rights Campaign, the national organization working for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equal rights, gathered together in the Phoenix area yesterday during their 2014 Gala.

Many of the plaintiffs from the two lawsuits currently in front of the Federal 9th Circuit Court attended the event to hear speakers and watch as the community presented awards to many of the Arizona corporate businesses and are fighting for equal rights within the state.

Lambda Legal Files Motion to Consolidate Recently Filed Case with our Case Filed on January 6, 2014

Section III of the motion title, "The Court Should Transfer This Case To Judge Sedwick," the motion asks to consolidate the cases to avoid any other orders to avoid unnecessary cost or delay.

Since both cases call for determinations of substantially the same questions of law, involve a common defendant, and would entail substantial duplication of labor if they are heard by different Judges, the motion is seeking not to cause any delay.

Arizona Tucson Star Mentions Sister Case Along With Our Clients

Arizona Daily StarSeven plaintiff couples and the legal team who filed suit on January 6, 2014 to overturn Arizona’s ban on same sex marriage applaud and support the seven plaintiff couples, two surviving spouses and Lambda Legal in their parallel March 13, 2014 filing. Our separate yet parallel efforts to overturn discriminatory Arizona laws targeting the LGBTQ community are a testament to our resolve for our freedom and to fight for equality, for those that can, those who cannot, and those who have gone before us. 

Shawn Aiken Comments on New Lawsuit

KTAR.comThe lawsuit is separate from a class-action lawsuit filed by four same-sex couples in January. Phoenix attorney Shawn Aiken, who filed the lawsuit, initially filed it against Horne and Gov. Jan Brewer as well as three Arizona county clerks. He has since dropped Horne and Brewer at the request of Assistant Attorney General Kathleen Sweeney and to avoid a prolonged series of legal motions. He plans to file a motion next month, asking the judge in the case to make a decision about the lawsuit without waiting for a trial. 

Aiken and his team have expressed support for Lambda Legal's suit, but both said there are no plans to join the two filings. 

ABC News 15: Lambda Legal Sister Lawsuit

ABC News 15 - Taking ActionThe Associated Press quotes the lead lawyer, Shawn Aiken, "My attitude is to the extent that if we both succeed, great. If they succeed where we fail, that's good too."

Arizona Denies Claims

KTARLawyers for the state of Arizona deny that the state's ban on same-sex marriage violates equal-protection and due-process rights.  The state Attorney General's office made the denial in a lawsuit that seeks to overturn the ban.  The seven same-sex couples who filed the lawsuit allege the ban violates equal-protection and due-process rights. They also alleged the ban denies them the benefits associated with marriage, such as spousal pension benefits, spousal survivorship rights and the ability to make medical decisions for each other. 

Arizona House Bill HB 2481: Another Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

Joseph Connolly - JoeCall to Action! One battle was won this week in the defeat of Arizona SB 1062. The war is NOT over! Seriously!  Arizona State Representative Steve Montenegro, R-Litchfield Park has introduced Arizona House Bill HB 2481.

As a person of faith, I know that any ordained minister, priest or pastor can refuse to marry any couple, straight or gay, for any reason. Government cannot tell a church how to run its ministry. It's called Freedom of Religion. It's in a document called the U. S. Constitution. And the Arizona Constitution cites it as the "supreme law of the land". Rep. Montenegro has sponsored this bill and he himself is a pastor in an Apostolic Church. On the surface it seems innocuous but it too has implications and unintended consequences like SB1062. Initially I was upset that a pastor was writing legislation for himself. Until *I* read the bill.... 

On the surface, HB 2481 is trying to put "protections" in place for "religious" leaders who may not want to "solemnize a marriage". It is being presented as a bill to protect religious leaders from having to perform marriage they may not want to do. Sound familiar? 

Video: Tucson couple joins lawsuit to legalize same sex marriage in Arizona

KGUN-TV, Tucsion, ArizonaAs the SB 1062 battle wages on, another fight is pushing Arizona to the front lines of the gay rights debate. Jeffrey Ferst and Peter Bramley are the seventh same sex couple to join a mass lawsuit, challenging Arizona's ban on same sex marriage. They are the only Tucson couple to do so. "We believe in each other.  We believe in our marriage," said Ferst.  "So it's very easy for us to take this step and go public because somebody needs to do it." That suit was first filed in January. Both Ferst and Bramley say joining the pool of plaintiffs, as SB 1062 comes to a head, underscores the importance of their fight.

Gov. Brewer's Delay in Action Is Now Causing Conventions to be Pulled from Arizona

HNBAThe HNBA announced today that it has pulled its 40th Annual Convention previously scheduled for Phoenix, Arizona in September 2015.

On Monday, February 24th, the HNBA denounced the Arizona legislature’s passage of SB 1062.  The HNBA also called for Governor Jan Brewer to veto the legislation and still hopes that she will do so.  As set forth in its February 24th press release, SB 1062 discriminates against members of Arizona’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community.  

The proposed legislation also impacts other citizens that are either traveling through Arizona or that are doing business or have business interests in the state.  Accordingly, the HNBA’s Board of Governors voted unanimously to immediately pull the Annual Convention. 

Tucson couple joins suit to overturn gay marriage ban

Arizona Daily StarOn a recent afternoon, a couple walked up to the clerk’s counter at Pima County Superior Court seeking a marriage license. Once there, however, they struggled to fill out the marriage license application because Peter Bramley and Jeffrey Ferst are both men. The state of Arizona doesn’t allow same-sex marriage, nor does it recognize such marriages performed in other states. “They were very nice,” Ferst said of the clerk’s office employees. Bramley, 59, president of a public relations and marketing firm, and Ferst, 58, an artist, first crossed out the word “bride” on the application and replaced it with “groom.” The court’s staff members said they couldn’t accept the document because it had been altered, but offered to let them fill out the form again with one of the men filling in the category for bride. Bramley opted for the designation. However, Ferst and Bramley did not get married at the courthouse that day. The couple have since joined in a lawsuit filed in January that challenges Arizona’s same-sex-marriage ban

Tucson Couple Joins Lawsuit - Peter Bramley and Jeff Ferst

KVOA-TVA local couple has joined a federal lawsuit that challenges Arizona's ban on same-sex marriage. Peter Bramley and Jeff erst are joining six other Arizona couples to try and overturn the state's voter-approved law. Back in 2008, more than 56 percent of Arizona voters approved a change to the state constitution, defining marriage as between one man and one woman. Bramley and Ferst were married in California last October, but now want Arizona to acknowledge it. "We wanted our marriage to be recognized the same as any other marriage is," Ferst said. The two joined the lawsuit in hopes of overturning Arizona's constitution, which prevents them from enjoying the many benefits of marriage.

We Need Your Help Now!

Without too much fanfare, our state legislator has passed the so-called Religious Freedom Bill.  Under the mask of a mis-leading title, the bill will allow businesses and employers to discriminate against anyone on the grounds of religious belief and sexual orientation.

Can you call Governor Brewer at 602.542.4331 or 520.628.6580 and ask her not to sign the SB1062/HB2153 bills? 

The Ungodly View of Religious Freedom

Arizona RepublicNow comes the latest from the Sue-Us-It-Ain’t-Our-Money Republican-controlled Arizona legislature. The state Senate has passed SB 1062, which simply put would allow business owners to discriminate against gays – and others – under the guise of exercising their religious beliefs. Critics of the legislation call it a “license to discriminate.” That’s understating it. Imagine the potential abuse when anyone in a business can refuse to accommodate a potential customer because doing so somehow infringes on his faith. Only in Arizona would lawmakers pass such an ungodly law in the name of religious freedom.

3TV Interview with Clark Rowley and David Chaney

Clark Rowley and David ChaneyNow that the revised complaint has been filed with the State of Arizona, David and Clark explain their reasons for pursuing and working with the other couples for the success of this lawsuit.

Two Flagstaff couples join same-sex lawsuit

Arizona Daily sunTwo Flagstaff couples have joined a federal class-action lawsuit seeking to overturn Arizona’s ban on same-sex marriage.

An amended complaint filed in U.S. District Court by two Flagstaff attorneys Monday added Meagan and Natalie Metz, Renee Kaminski and Robin Reece to a lawsuit asking the federal courts to declare Arizona’s laws against same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

The Metzes, who are legally married in the state of Washington, filed an application in Coconino County Superior Court for an Arizona marriage license so their marriage would be recognized in this state. That application was denied under a law passed by the Arizona Legislature in 1996 that made same-sex marriages the only exception to a state law recognizing legal marriages performed outside Arizona as valid.

TV 12 Report - Flagstaff Couples Joining Suit

Flagstaff CouplesFlagstaff couples now joining lawsuit.

TV3 Interview with Shawn Aiken - Response to Holder
TV3 Shawn AikenAttorney General Eric Holder says he is set to extend the federal government's recognition of same-sex marriages even in the 34 states that don't consider it legal. Listen to Attorney Shawn Aiken's response and how it affects the couples law suit with the State of Arizona to change the State's constitution.

Courage - Glenn Gullickson, Echo Magazine Managing Editor

Glenn GullicksonGlenn Gullickson write in Echo Magazine, January 30, 2014, "With the Winter Olympics in the spotlight, the LGBT community watches Sochi, Russia, and wonders if athletes will make a courageous gesture in support of LGBT rights in a country where laws oppress the gay community.

It's another reminder that despite some shortcomings, Americans are part of a pretty great system that's sometimes taken for granted. It's a system that still needs improvement, but it offers methods to make changes.

But even at home it still takes courage to stand up for LGBT rights. ..."

Arizona same-sex couples challenge state laws

KPCCAcross the country the legal landscape for same-sex marriage is changing, and fast. In the Southwest in recent weeks, courts in New Mexico and Utah have delivered victories to gay marriage proponents. Now in neighboring Arizona, some gay and lesbian couples are challenging their state’s definition of marriage

Same-Sex Couples Challenging Arizona Marriage Laws

Texas Public RadioAcross the country the legal landscape for same-sex marriage is changing, and fast. In the Southwest in recent weeks, courts in New Mexico and Utah have delivered victories to gay marriage proponents. Now in neighboring Arizona, some gay and lesbian couples are challenging their state’s definition of marriage. From the Fronteras Desk in Phoenix, Jude Joffe-Block reports

NPR All Things Considered - January 17, 2014

FronterasFriday, January 17, 2014 - All Things Considered. Marriage Equality Segment by NPR Senior Field Correspondent Jude Joffe-Block.

Echo Magazine - January 16-19, 2014

Echo MagazineThe attorney representing four gay couples challenging Arizona's ban on same-sex marriage in federal district court said he hopes that there will be a decision in the case this year. "It's time for this issue to be decided in Arizona," Shawn K. Aiken said about the class action lawsuit he filed Jan. 6 in U.S. District Court in Phoenix. Aiken is representing three male couples and one female couple in a bid to legalize same-sex marriage by overturning Arizona's one man-one woman constitutional definition of marriage approved by voters in 2008. In the brief filed with the court, Aiken said that it's expected that the same-sex marriage issue will eventually be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Arizona Republic - EJ Montini - First-class people; secondclass citizens

AZ Central Logo - The Arizona RepublicEJ Montini writes, "They look like us. They have jobs like us. Drive cars like us. They live in our neighborhoods. They go to the same grocery stores, restaurants and movie theaters. Their kids attend the same schools as our kids. They work hard. They pay taxes. They vote. They’re first-class people, and they’re wondering why we keep treating them like second-class citizens. “Yes, that’s the heart of it,” said attorney Shawn Aiken. “This is discrimination, and that’s why you take the issue to court.”  Last week four same-sex couples, two of them with children, filed a class-action lawsuit challenging Arizona’s ban on same-sex marriage."

MSNBC Shawn Aiken - Friday, January 10, 2014

MSNBCInterview from Friday, January 10, 2014, with Shawn Aiken, lawyer for four Arizona couples who filed a law suit against the State of Arizona for equal rights regarding same-sex marriage.  See http://arizonaequality.org for more details.

Eight, Arizona PBS - Horizon - 5:30 pm - January 9, 2014

PBS Channel EightSame-sex Marriage Lawsuit  in Arizona 
Eight, Arizona PBS - Horizon - 5:30 pm - January 9, 2014

Ted Simons interviews Shawn Aiken, lawyer for the Plaintiffs

Four same-sex Arizona couples have filed a suit against Arizona’s law that restricts marriage to opposite-sex couples. Shawn Aiken, the plaintiff’s attorney, will talk about the suit.

Slow, steady campaign for same-sex marriage in Arizona

The BuglePHOENIX -- Gays hoping to wed in Arizona should not look for legal relief soon.

The four couples who filed suit Monday to void Arizona's ban on recognizing same-sex marriages are not asking U.S. District Court Judge John Sedwick for an immediate injunction. That could have forced the issue into court within weeks.

Instead, attorney Shawn Aiken is biding his time. He wants a full-blown trial on the merits -- and, then, hopefully, a permanent injunction requiring the state to start issuing marriage licenses to gays.

But that could take months -- or even longer.

At the same time, Sedwick's willingness to strike down both a long-standing state law and a 2008 voter-approved state constitutional amendment could turn on what is now playing out in Denver. That is where the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is going to hear arguments about a federal judge's ruling in Utah saying that gays can legally wed in that state.

Lawsuit Filed in Arizona Challenges Gay Marriage Ban

The Christian PostFour couples in Arizona filed a class action lawsuit against the state this week, challenging its constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. The arguments employed in the lawsuit reportedly reflect the lawsuit that ultimately overturned Utah's ban on same-sex marriage. "We are asking for relief on behalf of all married and unmarried same-sex couples in Arizona," attorney Shawn Aiken, who is representing the four same-sex couples in the lawsuit, said in a statement. "Now is the time to take up this issue." The lawsuit reportedly argues that the Supreme Court's June ruling, which struck down a key provision of the Defense of Marriage Act and thus awarded some federal benefits to same-sex couples, should be reason for Arizona to legalize same-sex marriage. The rationale behind this argument is that same-sex couples receiving federal benefits should also have their union recognized by individual states. "We're saying, 'Look, follow that rationale and make the same declaration as to the law in Arizona,' " Aiken said, according to the Arizona Republic. "It's that simple." Those being represented in the recent Arizona lawsuit include Joseph Connolly and Terrel Pochert from Pinal County, Suzanne Cummins and Holly Mitchell of Maricopa County, Clark Rowley and David Chaney of Maricopa County, and Mason Hite and Christopher Devine, also of Maricopa County.

Marriage Equality in the Courts - now includes Arizona

Blog for ArizonaThe Supreme Court on Monday morning put on hold a federal judge’s decision striking down Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage, thus stopping a wave of such marriages across the state.  The Court’s order reinstates the state ban and will keep it intact until after a federal appeals court has ruled on it.

The order appeared to have the support of the full Court, since there were no noted dissents.  The ruling can be interpreted as an indication that the Court wants to have further exploration in lower courts of the basic constitutional question of state power to limit marriage to a man and a woman.  Had it refused the state’s request for delay, that would have left at least the impression that the Court was comfortable allowing same-sex marriages to go forward in the thirty-three states where they are still not permitted by state law.

The order, however, cannot be interpreted as a dependable indication of how the Court will rule on the issue when it finally decides to do so directly.

Lawyer Hopes Ariz. Marriage Suit Gets Decided in 2014

Edge on the NetPHOENIX - An attorney who filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn Arizona’s same-sex marriage ban said Tuesday he hopes to get a decision from a federal judge before the U.S. Supreme Court rules on any similar challenge from another state.

The lawsuit filed by four same-sex couples who live in Arizona came Monday as the U.S. Supreme Court halted same-sex marriages in Utah while a federal appeals court considers the long-term question of whether gay couples have a right to wed in that state.

The nation’s highest court didn’t rule on the merits of the Utah case or on same-sex marriage bans in general, but is expected to eventually decide the issue.

Arizona gay marriage ban challenged

The Washington BladePHOENIX—Four gay couples on Jan. 6 filed a federal class-action lawsuit that seeks to overturn Arizona’s same-sex marriage ban.

“We are asking for relief on behalf of all married and unmarried same-sex couples in Arizona,” attorney Shawn Aiken told the Arizona Republic. “Now is the time to take up this issue.”

The lawsuit names Gov. Jan Brewer and Attorney General Tom Horne as defendants.

Arizona voters in 2008 approved a state constitutional amendment that defines marriage as between a man and a woman. The U.S. Supreme Court in June declined to hear Brewer’s appeal that asked the justices to allow her to ban state employees from receiving benefits for same-sex partners.

Arizona's Gay Marriage Ban Is Unconstitutional

Top Class ActionsOn Monday, four same-sex Arizona couples filed a class action lawsuit, claiming the state’s voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional.

In the class action lawsuit, the plaintiffs cite the U.S. Supreme Court’s June U.S. v. Windsor decision, which found a portion of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was unconstitutional. As a result of this decision, legally-wed gay couples can file joint federal tax returns and are entitled to survivor benefits.

Marriage equality suit filed in Arizona

MSNBC LogoThree-hundred-and-sixty miles away from the conservative stronghold of Utah – where the U.S. Supreme Court left in legal limbo hundreds of same-sex marriages on Monday – four gay couples in Arizona began the courtroom battle of changing another red state’s marriage laws. In a federal class-action lawsuit filed Monday, plaintiffs argue Arizona’s 17-year-old ban on same-sex marriage violates gay couples’ constitutional rights to equal protection and due process under the 14th Amendment. The case is one of dozens of suits filed across more than 15 states against laws prohibiting gay couples from marrying, and one of the first federal challenges in the 9th Circuit since the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for federal agencies to begin recognizing same-sex marriages. That case, United States v. Windsor, which gutted the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA,) as well as two more landmark decisions, Loving v. Virginia, which struck down bans on interracial marriage, and Lawrence v. Texas, which invalidated anti-sodomy laws, all play significant roles in the Arizona complaint. Its language also reflects what marriage equality advocates and opponents alike believe to be inevitable–that the nation’s highest court will soon have to answer the question of whether any ban on same-sex marriage falls in line with the U.S. Constitution.

KVOA-TV Lawyer hopes marriage suit gets decided in 2014

KVOA-TVAn attorney who filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn Arizona's same-sex marriage ban says he hopes to get a decision from a federal judge before the U.S. Supreme Court rules on any similar challenge from another state. The lawsuit came Monday as the U.S. Supreme Court halted same-sex marriages in Utah while a federal appeals court considers the long-term question of whether gay couples have a right to wed in Utah. The Supreme Court didn't rule on the merits of the Utah case or on same-sex marriage bans, but is expected to eventually decide the issue. Attorney Shawn Aiken says that he hopes to get a decision this year in his clients' challenge to the Arizona law and believes the Supreme Court wouldn't likely resolve the issue until 2015

Tucson News Now - Lawyer hopes marriage suit gets decided in 2014

Tucson News NowAn attorney who tiled a lawsuit seeking to overturn Arizona's same-sex marriage ban says he hopes to geta decision from a federal judge before the U.S. Supreme Court rules on any similar challenge from another state.

The lawsuit came Monday as the U.S. Supreme Court halted same-sex marriages in Utah while a federal appeals court considers the long-term question of whether gay couples have a right to wed in Utah.

The Supreme Court didn't rule on the merits ofthe Utah case or on same-sexmarriage bans, but is expected to eventually decide the issue.

Attorney Shawn Aiken says that he hopes to get a decision this year in his clients' challenge to the Arizona law and believes the Supreme Court wouldn't likely resolve the issue until 2015.

Arizona Couples Sue for Marriage Equality

The AdvocateFour Arizona same-sex couples have filed a suit in federal court seeking to strike down their state’s constitutional provision limiting marriage to male-female couples.

The suit, filed Monday, names Arizona governor Jan Brewer, state attorney general Tom Horne, and Maricopa County Superior Court clerk Michael Jeanes as defendants, reports Phoenix radio station KTAR. Maricopa County includes Phoenix, the state’s capital and largest city.

Suit to overturn Arizona gay-marriage ban filed

Arizona Daily StarHoward Fischer with the Capitol Media Services writes in the Arizona Star, "PHOENIX — Gays hoping to wed in Arizona should not look for legal relief soon.

The four couples who filed suit Monday to void Arizona’s ban on recognizing same-sex marriages are not asking U.S. District Court Judge John Sedwick for an immediate injunction. That could have forced the issue into court within weeks.

Class-action lawsuit challenges Arizona marriage equality ban

Equality on TrialRe-write of the story that orginally appeard on the KTAR Radio website in Phoenix, Arizona:

Four Arizona same-sex couples filed a lawsuit yesterday in federal district court seeking to invalidate the state’s ban on marriage equality.

Four Gay Couples Challen Arizona's Gay Marriage Ban

On Top MagazineA lawsuit filed Monday on behalf of four gay and lesbian couples challenges the constitutionality of Arizona's gay marriage ban. Arizona voters in 2008 approved Proposition 102, which limits marriage to heterosexual couples, two years after rejecting Proposition 107, which sought to prohibit gay couples from marriage, civil unions and possibly domestic partnerships.

Suit filed to allow same-sex marriages in Arizona

AZ Family TV3Jared Dillingham of 3TV writes, "PHOENIX (AP) -- Four couples have filed a class-action lawsuit seeking to make same-sex marriage legal in Arizona. The suit filed Monday claims a voter-approved ban on gay marriage is unconstitutional. It seeks to allow same-sex couples to be married and recognize same-sex marriages conducted in other states. "I think most people expect that this issue will eventually be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court," said attorney Shawn Aiken, who filed the suit. "It would make our lives better and simpler and easier," plaintiff Mason Hite told 3TV. Hite and his husband, Chris Devine, were married in California, but have lived together in Phoenix for more than a decade."

Suit filed to allow same-sex marriages in Arizona

The State - South CarolinaSouth Carolina's Homepage, The State, reports: PHOENIX — Four couples have filed a class-action lawsuit seeking to make same-sex marriage legal in Arizona.

The suit filed Monday claims a voter-approved ban on gay marriage is unconstitutional. It seeks to allow same-sex couples to be married and recognize same-sex marriages conducted in other states.

"I think most people expect that this issue will eventually be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court," attorney Shawn Aiken, who filed the suit, told Phoenix radio station KTAR (http://bit.ly/1db4xIL ).

The suit names Gov. Jan Brewer and Attorney General Tom Horne among the defendants. There was no immediate response Monday night from either Brewer's of Horne's offices.

Suit filed to allow same-sex marriages in Arizona

The Arizona RepublicFour Arizona same-sex couples are challenging Arizona’s definition of marriage as between only one man and one woman.

Their federal class-action lawsuit echoes arguments used in a challenge to Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage. The Utah case was thrown into legal limbo Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court halted same-sex marriages in the state while the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals considers the arguments.

“We are asking for relief on behalf of all married and unmarried same-sex couples in Arizona,” said attorney Shawn Aiken. “Now is the time to take up this issue.”

Suit Filed to Allow Same-Sex Marriages in Arizona - ABC 15, Phoenix

ABC 15 NewsPHOENIX - Four couples have filed a class-action lawsuit seeking to make same-sex marriage legal in Arizona.

 


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Plaintiff's Recommended Reading

Same-Sex Marriage in the United States: The Road to the Supreme Court (Kindle Download) Social issues in contemporary U.S. politics. State court decisions finding in favor of same-sex relationship equality claims have been central to the issue’s ascent from nowhere to near the top of the national political agenda. Same-Sex Marriage in the United States tells the story of the legal and cultural shift, its backlash, and how it has evolved over the past 15 years. There is a clear story of jurisprudential evolution with regards to same-sex marriage from Hawaii, through Vermont, Massachusetts, New Jersey, California, Connecticut, and, remarkably, Iowa in 2009. This book aids in a classroom examination of the legal, political, and social developments surrounding the issue of same-sex marriage in the United States. While books about same-sex marriage have proliferated in recent years, few, if any, have provided a clear and comprehensive account of the litigation for same-sex marriage, and its successes and failures, as this book does.

Unprotected Texts (Kindle Download) Boston University’s cutting-edge religion scholar Jennifer Wright Knust reveals the Bible’s contradictory messages about sex in this thoughtful, riveting, and timely reexploration of the letter of the gospels. In the tradition of Bart Erhman’s Jesus Interrupted and John Shelby Spong’s Sins of Scripture, Knust’s Unprotected Texts liberates us from the pervasive moralizing—the fickle dos and don’ts—so often dictated by religious demagogues. Knust’s powerful reading offers a return to the scripture, away from the mere slogans to which it is so often reduced.


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